Tag Archives: American history

David Treuer – The Heartbeat of Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present

David Treuer is Ojibwe from the Leech Lake Reservation in northern Minnesota. The author of four previous novels, most recently Prudence, and two books of nonfiction, he has also written for The New York Times, Los Angeles Times, Esquire, Slate, and The Washington Post, among others. He has a Ph.D. in anthropology and teaches literature and creative writing at the University of Southern California.

David Treuer’s latest book, THE HEARTBEAT OF WOUNDED KNEE: NATIVE AMERICA FROM 1890 TO THE PRESENT, is published by Riverhead Books.

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Here is an edited extract from The Heartbeat at Wounded Knee: Native America from 1890 to the Present, referenced in this interview, which was published in The Guardian.

From casinos to cannabis: the Native Americans embracing the pot revolution https://www.theguardian.com/news/2019/mar/15/from-casinos-to-cannabis-the-native-americans-embracing-the-pot-revolution

Jay Riestenberg: Article V Constitutional Convention of the States

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Jay Riestenberg is Campaigns & States Media Strategist for Common Cause, a nonpartisan grassroots organization founded in 1970 dedicated to upholding the core values of American democracy. They are opposed to an Article V Constitutional Convention of the States, which has never been convened since 1787. Organizations, such as the American Legislative Exchange Council (ALEC) & the Tea Party, along with billionaires such as the Koch brothers & The Mercer family have already garnered 27 of the 34 state legislatures required for such a convention to be called.

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The late Supreme Court Justice, Antonin Scalia, had this to say: ” I certainly would not want a constitutional convention. Whoa! Who knows what would come out of it?” …. (it is) “a horrible idea. This is not a good century to write a Constitution.”

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Article V of the United States Constitution:

“The Congress, whenever two thirds of both Houses shall deem it necessary, shall propose Amendments to this Constitution, or, on the Application of the Legislatures of two thirds of the several States, shall call a Convention for proposing Amendments, which, in either Case, shall be valid to all Intents and Purposes, as part of this Constitution, when ratified by the Legislatures of three fourths of the several States, or by Conventions in three fourths thereof, as the one or the other Mode of Ratification may be proposed by the Congress; Provided that no Amendment which may be made prior to the Year One thousand eight hundred and eight shall in any Manner affect the first and fourth Clauses in the Ninth Section of the first Article; and that no State, without its Consent, shall be deprived of its equal Suffrage in the Senate.”

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