Tag Archives: bureaucracy

Jon D. Michaels CONSTITUTIONAL COUP: Privatization’s Threat to the American Republic

Professor Jon D. Michaels’ scholarly and teaching interests include constitutional law, administrative law, national security law, the separation of powers, presidential power, regulation, bureaucracy, and privatization.

After a very distinguished education including Oxford and Yale Universities, he clerked, first for Judge Guido Calabresi of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit, and then for Justice David Souter of the U.S. Supreme Court. Immediately prior to his appointment at UCLA, he worked as an associate in Arnold & Porter’s National Security Law and Public Policy Group in Washington, DC.

We discuss his book, CONSTITUTIONAL COUP: PRIVATIZATION’S THREAT TO THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, which is both a history and an analysis of privatization, and the rise of what he calls ” Pax Administrativa.” It is published by Harvard University Press.

We begin with an article by Matthew Cole & Jeremy Scahill in The Intercept:
“Trump White House Weighing Plans for Private Spies to Counter ‘Deep State'”

We also referred to Professor Michaels’ essay, “First Tragedy, Now Farce”: